Outdoor Playtime for Children May Help Prevent Nearsightedness

Children who spend more time outdoors playing sports are less likely to become nearsighted.  This is according to a recent study of urban 6 year olds.

Not being outside and performing lost of near work will increase the risk a lot of needing glasses to see.  Nearsightedness also known as myopia has also been linked to an increase in higher education and of non-European heritage.

Researchers in Rotterdam have looked at nearly 6000 children who have participated in the study since birth along with their mothers.  At the age of 6, a significant percentage were found to have myopia, or nearsightedness.  Using statistical techniques to analyze a wide variety of factors, included social economic aspects of the household, ethnicity, lifestyle, parents’ education levels, children’s activities and other links between these and the likelihood a child would be nearsighted.  The study found that myopic children spent less time outdoors, had lower levels of vitamin D, had a higher body mass index and were less likely to play sports than children who were not nearsighted.

The differences in the prevalence between ethnic groups may be assumed to be genetics as well as differences in lifestyles between ethnic groups.  As the result of this research, it was suggested that parents should have children play outside for 15 hours a week and limit near work to no longer than 45 continuous minutes.

The main thing parents to remember is children vision is the primary sense through which they learn.  It was the conclusion of this study that parents get a dilated eye exam from an eye care professional such as those here at Bright Eyes Vision.  Regular eye care is essential people can do to maintain their eye health.

While the weather is nice, have your children put down their tablets and cell phones and get outside and play